Be careful inside try-catch blocks in Javascript async functions. If you don't use await, an error that's thrown might not stop the execution of subsequent code. Consider this:

const evilFunction = async () => {throw new Error("I'm evil");};

const goodCode = async () => {
  try {
    await evilFunction();
    console.log("Everything went well!"); // narrator: no, it didn't.
  } catch (e) {}
};

const badCode = async () => {
  try {
    evilFunction();
    console.log("Everything went well!"); // again, it didn't, but this time it's worse: the success message was actually logged.
  } catch (e) {}
};

The problem in the badCode example is that since we're not waiting for the call to evilFunction to return, the rest of the code continues executing.

Final thoughts

I love it when programming languages keep you on your toes with hard to debug details like this. /sarcasm

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